Our Scholars

Since its inception, the BSSP has been the flagship recruiting mechanism for attracting junior instructional faculty in key areas of biomedical investigation. Scholars earn many of the most prestigious awards in biomedical sciences.

The program also invigorated a new culture of excellence in the biomedical sciences by establishing world-renowned programs in key scientific fields, taking advantage of U-M’s interdisciplinary culture and mentorship.

Browse scholars by recruitment year, below.

Year Recruited: 2021
( 4 Scholars )

Maria Colonel, PhD

Univeristy of Florida
Affiliation(s):
Biomedical Engineering
Research Interests

TBA

Joshua Emrick, DDS, PhD

University of California, San Francisco - School of Dentistry (PhD & DDS), National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (Dental Clinical Research Fellow/Postdoc)
Affiliation(s):
School of DentistryDepartment of Biologic and Materials Sciences & Prosthodontics
Research Interests
The mouth provides us with remarkable sensations.
We bite into, adeptly manipulate, and crunch foods without inflicting self-injury. Our dentition and supporting structures routinely tolerate extreme forces of mastication, yet they also allow us to discern minuscule changes in bite and unanticipated hard particulates in food. We hardly notice these forces in normal chewing function; however, if the teeth are damaged and the dental pulps become inflamed, their sensory input is altered and we begin to experience excruciating pain – the toothache.
In thinking about these phenomena, we also wonder: What makes the tongue and lips profoundly sensitive to touch? How do common components (i.e., sensory neurons) provide us with unique sensations from distinct tissues? What makes our mouth feel dry? Why is tooth pain exquisite? And how do we inherently “know” the position of our teeth, jaws, and tongue when we eat and speak?
 
The Emrick lab is interested in answering these types of questions (and others) by studying the molecules, cells, and circuitry of the sensory nervous system innervating the mouth, head, and neck. In essence, we want to understand how it all encodes oral and craniofacial information, contributes to normal tissue function, and ultimately drives reflexes and perceptions.

Lauren Surface, PhD

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Affiliation(s):
School of DentistryDepartment of Biologic and Materials Sciences & Prosthodontics
Research Interests

TBA

Chase Weidmann, PhD

University of Michigan, Biological Chemistry
Affiliation(s):
Biological Chemistry
Research Interests

TBA